1990s Post-Soviet aliyah

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Part of a series on

Aliyah

Jewish immigration to the Land of Israel

Concepts

Promised Land
Gathering of Israel
Diaspora

Negation

Homeland for the Jewish people
Zionism
Jewish question
Law of Return

Pre-Modern Aliyah

Return to Zion
Old Yishuv
Perushim

Aliyah in modern times

First
Second
during World War I
Third
Fourth
Fifth
Aliyah Bet
Bricha
from Muslim countries

Yemen
Iraq
Morocco
Lebanon

from the Soviet Union

post-Soviet

from Ethiopia
from Latin America

Absorption

Revival of the Hebrew language

Ulpan
Hebraization of surnames

Kibbutz
Youth village
Immigrant camps
Ma’abarot
Development town
Austerity

Organizations

World Zionist Organization
Jewish National Fund
Jewish Agency for Israel
Youth Aliyah
Mossad LeAliyah Bet
El Al
Ministry of Immigrant Absorption
Nefesh B’Nefesh
Am Yisrael Foundation

Related topics

Yishuv
Sabra
Yerida
Jewish refugees
History of the Jews in the Land of Israel
Demographic history of Palestine (region)
Historical Jewish population comparisons
Yom HaAliyah

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The 1990s Post-Soviet aliyah began en masse in late 1980s when the government of Mikhail Gorbachev opened the borders of the USSR and allowed Jews to leave the country for Israel.
Between 1989 and 2006, about 1.6 million Soviet Jews and their non-Jewish relatives and spouses, as defined by the Law of Return, emigrated from the former Soviet Union.[1] About 979,000, or 61%, migrated to Israel. Another 325,000 migrated to the United States, and 219,000 migrated to Germany.[2][3] According to the Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics, 26% of the immigrants who arrived in Israel were not considered Jewish by Orthodox interpretations of Jewish law (which only recognizes matrilineal descent), but were eligible for Israeli citizenship under the Law of Return due to patrilineal Jewish descent or marriage to a Jew.[4] The majority of the immigrant wave were Ashkenazi Jews; however, a significant proportion were Mizrahi groups such as the Mountain Jews, Georgian Jews, and Bukharan Jews – with each ethnic group bringing its own distinctive culture to Israel. The group successfully integrated economically into Israel: in 2012, the average salary of FSU (Former
서양야동

McLarty Treasure Museum

McLarty Treasure Museum

Location within Florida

Established
1971[1]

Location
13180 North A1A
Vero Beach, Florida ,

Coordinates
27°49′23″N 80°24′35″W / 27.822985°N 80.409622°W / 27.822985; -80.409622

Type
Maritime Archaeology

Director
Florida Park Service

The McLarty Treasure Museum is located at 13180 North A1A on Orchid Island, north of Windsor and Vero Beach, Florida, on the barrier island at the north end of Indian River County. The museum occupies part of the former site of the Survivors’ and Salvagers’ Camp – 1715 Fleet, and is part of Sebastian Inlet State Park. It houses exhibits on the history of the 1715 Spanish treasure fleet,[2]and it features artifacts, displays, and an observation deck that overlooks the Atlantic Ocean. An A&E Network production, The Queen’s Jewels and the 1715 Fleet, is shown, telling of the fleet’s attempt to return to Spain when a hurricane struck off the Florida coast 300 years ago.
The property for the museum was donated to the State by Mr. Robert McLarty, a retired Atlanta attorney who lived in Vero Beach.[3]
Notes[edit]

^ The framed photo of the museum on display at the official opening, and currently on display in the museum, bears the official opening date of March 27, 1971.
^ Florida State Parks. “Sebastian Inlet Museum”, Florida State Parks website. Retrieved on May 6, 2015
^ Atocha Treasure Company. “McLarty Treasure Museum”, Atocha Treasure Company website. Retrieved on April 1, 2015

Gallery[edit]

Front view of McLarty Treasure Museum

Front oblique view of McLarty Treasure Museum

Historical marker in front of museum designating the site of the Survivors’ and Salvagers’ Camp – 1715 Fleet

Replicas of treasure recovered from the Atocha shipwreck in the Florida Keys

“Blown shoreward and wrecked along inshore reefs, the fleet strewed its riches along a vast stretch of Florida’s eastern coast.” Oil painting on three wood panels, on display in museum

Official photo of McLarty Treasure Museum, displayed at the ceremonial opening of the museum on March 27, 1971; on display in the museum

A helmet and breastplate were worn mainly by Spanish foot soldiers and helped protect the body from piercing weapons and gunfire.

Precious metals including silver, copper, and gold were shipped back to Spain in various forms. This pie wedge of silver was shaped for shipment in a barrel.

This gilded pitche

Apogoninae

Apogoninae

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Chordata

Class:
Actinopterygii

Order:
Perciformes

Family:
Apogonidae
Günther, 1859

Subfamily:
Apogoninae

The Apogoninae are the most species-rich and, of its shape, size, color and habitat, most diverse subfamily of cardinal fish (Apogonidae). It can be found in coastal tropical and subtropical regions of the Indian Ocean, the eastern Pacific and the Atlantic, down to depths of 300 meters.
References[edit]

Mabuchi, K., Fraser, T.H., Song, H., Azuma, Y. & Nishida, M. (2014): Revision of the systematics of the cardinalfishes (Percomorpha: Apogonidae) based on molecular analyses and comparative reevaluation of morphological characters. Zootaxa, 3846 (2): 151–203. doi: 10.11646/zootaxa.3846.2.1

Saint-Sébastien, Quebec

Saint-Sébastien, Quebec can refer to:

Saint-Sébastien, Estrie, Quebec, in Le Granit Regional County Municipality
Saint-Sébastien, Montérégie, Quebec, in Le Haut-Richelieu Regional County Municipality

This disambiguation page lists articles about distinct geographical locations with the same name.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

분당오피

Derek Pagel

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Derek Pagel

No. 20, 37

Position:
Safety

Personal information

Date of birth:
(1979-10-24) October 24, 1979 (age 37)

Place of birth:
Plainfield, Iowa

Career information

College:
Iowa

NFL Draft:
2003 / Round: 5 / Pick: 140

Career history

New York Jets (2003–2004)
Dallas Cowboys (2005)

Career highlights and awards

Second-team All-Big Ten (2002)

Career NFL statistics

Tackles:
15

Sacks:
0

Interceptions:
0

Player stats at NFL.com

Derek L. Pagel (born October 24, 1979) is a former American football safety who played in the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the New York Jets in the fifth round of the 2003 NFL Draft. He played college football at Iowa. Pagel was also a member of the Dallas Cowboys.
External links[edit]

Iowa Hawkeyes bio
New York Jets bio

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New York Jets 2003 NFL draft selections

Dewayne Robertson
Victor Hobson
B. J. Askew
Derek Pagel
Matt Walters
Brooks Bollinger
Dave Yovanovits

인천오피

Ab Nuk

Ab Nuk
اب نوك

village

Ab Nuk

Coordinates: 31°11′55″N 50°28′53″E / 31.19861°N 50.48139°E / 31.19861; 50.48139Coordinates: 31°11′55″N 50°28′53″E / 31.19861°N 50.48139°E / 31.19861; 50.48139

Country
 Iran

Province
Kohgiluyeh and Boyer-Ahmad

County
Kohgiluyeh

Bakhsh
Charusa

Rural District
Tayebi-ye Sarhadi-ye Gharbi

Population (2006)

 • Total
191

Time zone
IRST (UTC+3:30)

 • Summer (DST)
IRDT (UTC+4:30)

Ab Nuk (Persian: اب نوك‎‎, also Romanized as Āb Nūk; also known as Ābnūk)[1] is a village in Tayebi-ye Sarhadi-ye Gharbi Rural District, Charusa District, Kohgiluyeh County, Kohgiluyeh and Boyer-Ahmad Province, Iran. At the 2006 census, its population was 191, in 34 families.[2]
References[edit]

^ Iranian National Committee for Standardization of Geographical Names website (Persian)
^ “Census of the Islamic Republic of Iran, 1385 (2006)”. Islamic Republic of Iran. Archived from the original (Excel) on 2011-11-11. 

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Kohgiluyeh County

Capital

Dehdasht

Districts

Central

Cities

Dehdasht
Suq

Rural Districts
and villages

Dehdasht-e Gharbi
(West Dehdasht)

Ab Kaseh
Ab Piyazi
Ab Talkh Filgah
Aliabad-e Ab Kaseh
Amir ol Mowmenin
Balarbisheh
Bimenjgan
Borj-e Ali Shir
Borj-e Ali Shir-e Olya
Borj-e Bahmani
Bowa-ye Olya
Bowa-ye Sofla
Buyeri
Chah Bardi
Chahab
Chahar Meh
Changalva
Cheshmeh Neyzehi Dezh Nargesi
Chir
Dam Tang-e Sulak
Damla Espid
Darreh Gordeh-ye Filgah
Darreh Kartikab
Deh-e Balut
Deh-e Balutak Kuh Bard
Deh-e Molla Malek
Deh-e Zu ol Faqar Sarperi
Dimeh Kuh-e Khayiz
Dowpar-e Qabr-e Kiamars
Emamzadeh Mohammad
Filgah
Hoseynabad-e Rowshanabad
Kalgah-e Pahn
Kalgeh Borun
Kushk-e Amir ol Momeyin
La Espid Seyyed Fakhr
Mir Hojjat Allah Chaharmeh
Mohammadabad
Naqareh Khaneh-ye Filgah
Nehzatabad
Nesah Kuh-e Bard
Papar
Pataveh-ye Dezh
Pir Badami
Puzeh-ye Kuhbord
Qaleh-ye Dezh Nargesi
Rowshanabad
Sar Chaharmeh
Sar Peri
Sar-e Mahur
Sarduk
Senagun
Sulak
Tang-e Khush Tuf Shirin

Dehdasht-e Sharqi
(East Dehdasht)

Ab Balutak
Ab Bid-e Heygun
Adrkan
Anjir-e Sefid
Aqa Ali Penah
Chahar Rah Beheshti Sapu
Cheshmeh Rizak Habibollah
Dammahad
Dargandeh
Dastgerd
Deh-e Amidvar
Deh-e Bardel
Deh-e Ebrahim
Deh-e Kabahar
Deh-e Kabuter Pirzal
Deh-e Mansur
Deh-e Pakel Allah Reza
Deh-e Ramezan
Dehnow-e Telmargh
Doband-e Sar Mast Dammahad
Emamzadeh Pahlavan
Kabmun Ali
Kayid-e Tang Sepu
Kelayeh-ye O
부산오피

Dugout canoe

A Slavic dugout boat from the 10th century

A dugout canoe or simply dugout is a boat made from a hollowed tree trunk. Other names for this type of boat are logboat and monoxylon. Monoxylon (μονόξυλον) (pl: monoxyla) is Greek — mono- (single) + ξύλον xylon (tree) — and is mostly used in classic Greek texts. In Germany they are called einbaum (“one tree” in English). Some, but not all, pirogues are also constructed in this manner.
Dugouts are the oldest boats archaeologists have found, dating back about 8,000 years to the Neolithic Stone Age.[1] This is probably because they are made of massive pieces of wood, which tend to preserve better than, e.g., bark canoes. Along with bark canoe and hide kayak, dugout boats were also used by indigenous peoples of the Americas.

Dugouts on the shore of Lake Malawi

Photographed in the Historic Center of Quito at the Old Military Hospital are these dug out canoes in the courtyard

Building a seagoing dugout canoe 10 metres (33 ft) long. The sides have likely been heated and bent outward.

Contents

1 Construction
2 Africa
3 Asia
4 Europe
5 The Americas
6 Pacific Islands
7 John F. Kennedy’s PT-109
8 See also
9 References
10 External links

Construction[edit]
Construction of a dugout begins with the selection of a log of suitable dimensions. Sufficient wood needed to be removed to make the vessel relatively light in weight and buoyant, yet still strong enough to support the crew and cargo. Specific types of wood were often preferred based on their strength, durability, and density. The shape of the boat is then fashioned to minimize drag, with sharp ends at the bow and stern.
First the bark is removed from the exterior. Before the appearance of metal tools, dugouts were hollowed out using controlled fires. The burnt wood was then removed using an adze. Another method using tools is to chop out parallel notches across the interior span of the wood, then split out and remove the wood from between the notches. Once hollowed out, the interior was dressed and smoothed out with a knife or adze.
More primitive designs keep the tree’s original dimensions, with a round bottom. However, it is possible to carefully steam the sides of the hollow log until they are pliable, then bend to create a more flat-bottomed “boat” shape with a wider beam in the centre.
For travel in the rougher waters of the ocean, dugouts can be fitted with outriggers. One or two smaller logs are mounted parallel

Compassion Suisse

Compassion Suisse is a Christian child sponsorship organisation dedicated to the long-term development of children living in poverty around the world. Compassion Suisse is the Swiss branch of Compassion International whose headquarters are in Colorado Springs. Compassion was founded in 1952 by Reverend Everett Swanson to help children orphaned by war in South Korea. Compassion International’s programs operate in over 26 developing countries and currently help more than 1.2 million children around the world.

Contents

1 History
2 Programs
3 Where They Work
4 References
5 External links

History[edit]
Compassion Switzerland was started in 2003, based from the CEO’s Concise home. In the same year, an association with the name Compassion Suisse was officially registered. In the first few years of their ministry, Compassion Suisse laid its focus on the French-speaking part of Switzerland. In 2009, the first office in the German-speaking part was founded in Aarau. In the same year, the main offices were moved to Yverdon. Currently, the CEO of Compassion Suisse is Philippe Mermod, who has been head of Compassion for over 7 years.[1]
Since 2006, Compassion is recognized by the Swiss Evangelical Alliance.[2]
Today, about 5000 children are helped by Compassion Suisse. Compassion Suisse is part of a worldwide network of people helping children. In partnership with Compassion USA, Canada, Australia, The Netherlands, France, New Zealand, Italy, Germany, South Korea, Spain and the United Kingdom, over 1.2 million children are helped by Compassion’s programs. Compassion Suisse has grown from a staff of two to a network of half a dozen paid staff members, plus several dedicated advocates and prayer partners.[3]
Programs[edit]
Compassion’s programs minister to the needs of individual children living in poverty throughout all stages of development; from the womb to university. Their programs also operate exclusively through the local chu rch in developing countries. Their programs are: – Child Survival Program – Child Sponsorship Program – Leadership Development Program – Complementary Interventions.
Where They Work[edit]
Compassion’s programs are currently operating in the following 26 countries. Each country office is staffed by local country personnel.

Africa
Asia
Central America
South America

Burkina Faso
Bangladesh
Dominican Republic
Bolivia

Ethiopia
India
El Salvador
Brazil

Ghana
Indonesia
Guatemala
Colombia

Kenya
Philippines
Haiti
Ecuador

Rwanda
Sri

Arthrogryposis–renal dysfunction–cholestasis syndrome

Arthrogryposis–renal dysfunction–cholestasis syndrome

Classification and external resources

OMIM
208085

[edit on Wikidata]

Arthrogryposis–renal dysfunction–cholestasis syndrome (also known as “ARC syndrome”) is a cutaneous condition caused by a mutation in the VPS33B gene.[1] Most of the cases have been survived for infancy. Recently, College of Medical Sciences in Nepal reports a case of ARC syndrome in a girl at the age of more than 18 years.
See also[edit]

Multiple sulfatase deficiency
List of cutaneous conditions

References[edit]

^ Rapini, Ronald P.; Bolognia, Jean L.; Jorizzo, Joseph L. (2007). Dermatology: 2-Volume Set. St. Louis: Mosby. ISBN 1-4160-2999-0. 

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Inherited disorders of trafficking / vesicular transport proteins

Vesicle formation

Lysosome/Melanosome:

HPS1-HPS7

Hermansky–Pudlak syndrome

LYST

Chédiak–Higashi syndrome

COPII:

SEC23A

Cranio–lenticulo–sutural dysplasia

COG7

CDOG IIE

APC:

AP1S2

X-linked intellectual disability

AP3B1

Hermansky–Pudlak syndrome 2

AP4M1

CPSQ3

Rab

ARL6

BBS3

RAB27A

Griscelli syndrome 2

CHM

Choroideremia

MLPH

Griscelli syndrome 3

Cytoskeleton

Myosin:

MYO5A

Griscelli syndrome 1

Microtubule:

SPG4

Hereditary spastic paraplegia 4

Kinesin:

KIF5A

Hereditary spastic paraplegia 10

Spectrin:

SPTBN2

Spinocerebellar ataxia 5

Vesicle fusion

Synaptic vesicle:

SNAP29

CEDNIK syndrome

STX11

Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis 4

Caveolae:

CAV1

Congenital generalized lipodystrophy 3

CAV3

Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2B, Long QT syndrome 9

Vacuolar protein sorting:

VPS33B

ARC syndrome

VPS13B

Cohen syndrome

DYSF

Distal muscular dystrophy

See also vesicular transport proteins

This dermatology article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Bansak

Bansak

Bansak

Location in Burma

Coordinates: 23°48′N 96°58′E / 23.800°N 96.967°E / 23.800; 96.967Coordinates: 23°48′N 96°58′E / 23.800°N 96.967°E / 23.800; 96.967

Country
 Burma

State
Kachin State

District
Bhamo District

Township
Bhamo Township

Population (2005)

 • Religions
Buddhism

Time zone
UTC + 6:30 (UTC+6.30)

Bansak is a village in Bhamo Township in Bhamo District in the Kachin State of north-eastern Burma.[1]
References[edit]

^ Maplandia world gazetteer

External links[edit]

Satellite map at Maplandia.com
Search for Bansak in the MSN Encarta atlas

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Kachin State

Capital: Myitkyina

Bhamo District

Bhamo Township
Mansi Township
Momauk Township
Shwegu Township

Mohnyin District

Hpakant Township
Mogaung Township
Mohnyin Township

Myitkyina District

Chipwi Township
Hsawlaw Township
Injangyang Township
Myitkyina Township
Tanai Township
Waingmaw Township

Putao District

Kawnglanghpu Township
Machanbaw Township
Nogmung Township
Putao Township
Sumprabum Township

Main cities and towns

Bhamo
Chipwi
Hsawlaw
Hsinbo
Hopin
Hpakant
Injangyang
Kamaing
Kawnglanghpu
Lweje
Machanbaw
Mansi
Mogaung
Mohnyin
Momauk
Myitkyina
Putao
Shwegu
Sumprabum
Tanai
Nogmung
Waingmaw
Ywathit

This Kachin State location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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