Alexandrian Crusade

Alexandrian Crusade

Part of the Crusades

Date
9 – 12 October 1365

Location
Alexandria, Egypt

Result
Cypriots control the city for three days then abandon the city

Belligerents

Kingdom of Cyprus
Republic of Venice
Knights Hospitaller
Mamluk Sultanate

Commanders and leaders

Peter I of Cyprus
Sultan Al-Ashraf Sha’ban
Emir Yalbugha al-Umari

Strength

165 ships
Unknown

Casualties and losses

Unknown
5000 enslaved[1]
20,000 killed [1]

v
t
e

Crusades

In the Holy Land (1095–1291)

First
People’s
1101
Norwegian
Venetian
Second
Third
1197
Fourth
Children’s
Fifth
Sixth
Barons’
Seventh
Shepherds’ 1251
Eighth
Ninth

After 1291

Shepherds’ 1320
Smyrniote 1343–1351
Alexandrian 1365
Savoyard 1366
Barbary 1390
Varna 1443

Northern Crusades (1147–1410)

Wendish 1147
Swedish

1150
1249
1293

Livonian 1198–1290
Prussian 1217–1274
Lithuanian 1283–1410

Against Christians

Bosnian 1235–1241
Albigensian 1209–1229
Aragonese 1284/5
Despenser’s 1382/3
Hussite 1419–1434

 Book:The Crusades
 Portal:Crusades

The brief Alexandrian Crusade, also called the sack of Alexandria,[2] occurred in October 1365 and was led by Peter I of Cyprus against Alexandria in Egypt. Relatively devoid of religious impetus, it differs from the more prominent Crusades in that it seems to have been motivated largely by economic interests.[3]

Contents

1 History
2 Interpretations
3 Notes and references
4 External links

History[edit]
Peter I spent three years, from 1362 to 1365, amassing an army and seeking financial support for a Crusade from the wealthiest courts of the day. When he learned of a planned Egyptian attack against his Kingdom of Cyprus, he employed the same strategy of preemptive war that had been so successful against the Turks and redirected his military ambitions against Egypt. From Venice, he arranged for his naval fleet and ground forces to assemble at the Crusader stronghold of Rhodes, where they were joined by the Knights of the Order of St. John.
In October 1365, Peter I set sail from Rhodes, himself commanding a sizable expeditionary force and a fleet of 165 ships, despite Venice’s greater economic and political clout. Landfall was made in Alexandria around 9 October, and over the next three days, Peter’s army looted the city killing thousands and taking 5000 people to be enslaved.[1] Mosques, temples, churches and the library also bore the brunt of the raid.[4][5]
Facing an untenable position, Pet